For Physicists

A two-year residency program for medical physicists is a clinical training program for a career in radiation oncology physics.

Medical physicists are individuals who have a strong background in physics, math and anatomy. The focus of a medical physicist is to make sure that radiation is administered safely and accurately. It is their job to make sure radiation is being administered properly to patients while making sure the staff and public are shielded and not inadvertently exposed. Medical physicists are an integral part of the radiation oncology team.

Who Should Apply

Many of our incoming residents began the program with a strong interest in the combination of radiation physics, computers and medicine but decided they didn’t want to be a doctor, computer scientist or nuclear engineer. The residency program is for individuals with an MS or PhD (DSc) from an approved institution, preferably from an AAPM accredited program, in Medical Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics Science or a closely related discipline degree.

About the Program

Emory's Radiation Oncology Medical Physics Residency Program is a two-year training program, under the supervision of experienced board certified radiation oncology physicists, within the Emory University School of Medicine. The Program's objective is to provide clinical training in radiation oncology physics that will prepare the graduate for board certification in the specialty of Therapeutic Radiological Physics by the American Board of Radiology and for a professional career in radiation oncology physics. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs through 2021.

The program provides residents with comprehensive training and experience in order to attain competency in the areas of dosimetry, treatment planning, treatment aid design and fabrication, brachytherapy, radiation safety, radiation machine calibration, imaging, special procedures and quality assurance.

Application Process More about Medical Physics